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Author Topic: Where is our inspirational thread?  (Read 5220 times)
Q_x
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« on: November 14, 2011, 02:23:56 PM »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UVXQjoOp4QQ

interesting content - scavenging old, deserted town hit by a volcano, starts around 9 min. This is hot climate, but still quite adequate.

I guess we should maybe gather some documents with places like this. First it's way better than what Hollywood throws at us (and easier to find), second - it also shows some interaction with the post-apo environment. It's quite the other side of what Alaska Experiment showed - that is coping with cold, hunger and small societies or groups of people.
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rowanthepreacher
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« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2011, 03:33:53 PM »

I have no clue how you manage to find stuff like this, Q.

Interesting to watch.

EDIT: The dude sounds like he's been gargling gravel.
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« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2011, 07:19:10 PM »

I don't know if it needs any management at all.
Myke has maybe been brainwashed a couple of times too many... Masculine beyond any limits. I can't imagine him being emotional, warm, liberal captain father.

But anyway - if there is nothing to take from the show for you, it's probably just a waste of time.

I don't know how much time was between eruption and when the footage was made.

What I'm sure of though, and what I've realised watching, is what can be scavenged from an abandoned city after good few years.

That's something different than "The Colony" - a show that's 100% directed and takes place during the actual apocalypse (folks were able to make diesel and racing fuel, repair a tractor, make motorized cart, wind generator and finally a fan-boat, all in 50 days). The couple really does "things" - they sleep on dirt, skin and eat stuff you see, get dehydrated, have headaches, probably also stink like hell, and only in really hard situations the crew interrupts and helps them, usually just calling for medical assistance.

Also I've realized that some tough bottles I have in my basement, that are screwed tightly since good 7 years, and their volatile content is probably still in good shape. Same things should apply to paint thinners and solvents, naphta, alcohol, water glass (yet another substance that may be useful and it's easy to make out of ash, water and sand). That's the bright side - scavenging. On the dark side is how hard may be just to live off the land, even in tropical paradise. Volcano dust that keeps on deposits is a bit like snow in cold climates - it grows, sometimes it's washed, finds it's way almost anywhere - just different stuff dares to live on it.
« Last Edit: November 16, 2011, 07:25:45 PM by Q_x » Logged

rowanthepreacher
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« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2011, 12:54:13 AM »

Hmm, so are you suggesting a slight shift in focus from survivalism to scavenging? We've got to keep in mind that PARPG is set a long time after the apocalypse, and most of the easy scavenging has aleady been done.
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« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2011, 03:35:01 PM »

Naah, I'm not suggesting any changes. I think we were concentrated on small groups of people and social interactions within, with some scavenging and some survival.

What I wanted to share is what seems to be pretty rare -  a kind of postapo documentary footage that is showed as a stage - here it's the survival show I happened to stumble upon. For inspiration rather than to copy it into our game. As an illustration of a problem possibly, or to have an example when needed.

There are very few places like that - big cities that were abandoned 5 to about 35 years ago and not scavenged or inhabited back. Some military bases, some disaster places like this and Chernobyl, but what else? In our game whole world may look like so. Ruins, rust, dust (moisture, snow and moss in our case). Scavenging - what will be left is a lead weight for any traveler, but it will be probably handy to take something from an old city while building any facilities or making tools.

Any kind of documentary is good in general, if it has at least small field common with our project, and that's why I'm posting odd, strange stuff like this.
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« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2011, 03:33:47 PM »

I'm in doubt when posting this.
So read before trying to watch...
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLBB09361AAF4C8199


Lars Monsen is one of best known modern cold climate long distance hikers. The event that made him famous worldwide was 2 year long travel across Canada.
This is few good hours of documentary/diary of Lars' year long travel in northern part of Europe, most of it in Nordkalotten. Show was made for NRK - Norwegian TV. This is version with English subtitles.

Why not to watch:
It's long, possibly really boring for urban dwellers
It's not post-apo, nor survival story

What is common with PARPG?
This is a story placed in our game terrain. You will find some real locations, landscapes, terrain, flora, fauna, problems it makes to the people and so on.
It helps to understand how people can travel in cold climates, it includes what's most probable also in case of our game: canoe, foot and dog sled travel.
It shows how one can camp, what type of equipment is used, what can be found in a wilderness cabin and so on.
It shows how people live in small groups, like a group of hunters.

I still don't know if it's all worth the time - there is little improvisation here, little repairs, modern equipment, shops and supplies.
« Last Edit: November 21, 2011, 04:20:04 PM by Q_x » Logged

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« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2011, 08:31:57 PM »

Just to reply myself a bit more, there is also Alone in the Wild

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xugVC41uHbs

A 50 day long adventure of Ed Wardle - cameraman, adventurer and explorer, who went into Yukon to live of the land.
This is yet another long documentary. Well filmed, well narrated. It is a bit chaotic in terms of episodes and numbers, so be sure to stick to one and don't mix things - there is original release from Channel 4, another series with almost the same footage was released by Discovery (or was it Nat Geo?), and finally there are some short clips of various origin - short rants, comments, made during or after the adventure edited out and published to promote the show. Also the equipment is documented on Channel 4 site.
What is important:
Ed, pretty much like our PC, is not an expert, he is just medicore guy, experienced outdoorsman, but not survivalist, nor hunter/trapper
Cold climate, Yukon is the part of Canada close to Alaska.
Solitude - Ed is basically alone from day 1 to day 50, he receives food once, but makes no real contact with the personel.
Starvation - from the very start Ed is unable to keep his stomach full. He tracks his health and shows how his body deterriorates. He tries to snare animals, fish, hunt with a rifle, without much success.
Travel - hiking several miles takes him twice the time expected, and it's nowhere near 40 km/day we estimated - more like 10 or 15.
Lanscapes - again, a bit similar to where our game will take place.
« Last Edit: November 21, 2011, 08:41:58 PM by Q_x » Logged

MrWillis
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« Reply #7 on: November 22, 2011, 12:55:28 AM »

eh thing is our character would probably be used to the wild and the like, and know how to shoot a gun properly, how to tear the skin off a fish, and skin a deer. It has been twenty years since the apocalypse. I really doubt someone would survive without basic 101 survival skills and learning how to hunt and cook.
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« Reply #8 on: November 22, 2011, 08:01:37 AM »

You will need a time to learn those. We will have characters that are anywhere between 15 and 45 years, and those who are 15 will not be better than Wardle, really. Scared, starving, no book with edible plants by hand.

And it's not about being an outdoors noob or not. It's about what can happen to the body and mind when living the life this way.
Check out "cabin fever" for just one of aspects of being alone. Look how much Ed is crying by the end of his adventure - and those are brave man's (he was on the north pole and climbed Mt. Everest before the show) sincere tears there, he was fair enough to tape it.

70 years old Dick you can know from similarly named "Alone in the Wilderness" performed week-long hikes in the middle of alaskan winter just to entertain himself and avoid going crazy.

I'll try to reply your mail today, I just ended a major job y-day.
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MrWillis
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« Reply #9 on: November 22, 2011, 10:06:59 PM »

You will need a time to learn those. We will have characters that are anywhere between 15 and 45 years, and those who are 15 will not be better than Wardle, really. Scared, starving, no book with edible plants by hand.

And it's not about being an outdoors noob or not. It's about what can happen to the body and mind when living the life this way.
Check out "cabin fever" for just one of aspects of being alone. Look how much Ed is crying by the end of his adventure - and those are brave man's (he was on the north pole and climbed Mt. Everest before the show) sincere tears there, he was fair enough to tape it.

70 years old Dick you can know from similarly named "Alone in the Wilderness" performed week-long hikes in the middle of alaskan winter just to entertain himself and avoid going crazy.

I'll try to reply your mail today, I just ended a major job y-day.


eh okay.
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