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Author Topic: Packaging for techdemo 1  (Read 11547 times)
Vaporice
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« on: October 29, 2009, 02:50:59 AM »

As we would like to ship a first techdemo release around the end of this year / beginning of the next year, we should start to investigate different approaches how we could ship these releases on the different supported platforms. Barra is looking into nsis for windows and already has a pretty solid idea on how to do it on windows.
Basicly the question is how to get it done on linux. And do we want to have a package on linux at all, we could just supply the source.
I think it wouldn't be good if everyone has to compile FIFE before they can try the demo so I think we should precompile this at least. Probably we could set up a personal ubuntu repository for the ubuntu fans if we've a place to host this.

Any ideas?
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b0rland
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« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2009, 10:19:19 AM »

There's no real need to set up an ubuntu repository. I think we can just produce .deb files (+ .rpm files for rpm-based distro users) and publish them on sourceforge.
It would probably make more sense if we managed to convince fife team to produce their own .deb/.rpm instead of packaging fife by ourselves though.
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mvBarracuda
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« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2009, 11:58:10 AM »

Hmm that doesn't really work b0rland because it would mean that FIFE would need to release precompiled packages whenever a FIFE-based game releases a new version. All FIFE-based games don't work with stable releases of FIFE but with the SVN trunk at this point.
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Kaydeth
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« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2009, 01:05:45 PM »

In case you are interested barra. I was able to put a windows installer together using two programs called py2exe and advanced installer. Let me know if you want information about that.

Here is the thread I posted before: http://forums.parpg.net/index.php?topic=351.0
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mvBarracuda
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« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2009, 01:16:49 PM »

Coolio kaydeth, totally forgot about it. On win32 I would like to avoid to actually use py2exe for the first techdemo release. I would personally prefer if we simply ship PARPG as Python scripts with a precompiled FIFE version and offer the user to install Python 2.5 & PyYAML in case he has not installed it yet. This way users can actually take a look into the Python code right away if they're happy to hack around or simply curious instead of wondering why a Python-based game ships as a binary. But I'm open to all kind of feedback in this field, how do the other win32 programmers feel about it?
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shevegen
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« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2009, 03:24:10 PM »

I would like to point out at this download page for Wine http://www.winehq.org/download/

It has a nice layout and offers a lot of binaries.

That being said, the wine team is probably bigger too ... if we can find maintainers then I think it is no problem
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mvBarracuda
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« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2009, 02:39:00 PM »

Updated the packaging ticket:
http://parpg-trac.cvsdude.com/parpg/ticket/113#comment:2

Simply too much work coming up in December for me, so I won't be able to look into win32 packaging for PARPG. Hopefully somebody else can take a look into it. I could provide a simple 7zip archive as option of last resort in case everyone is busy and nobody can look into creating an installer for PARPG on win32.

EDIT: we could use something like PortablePython on Win32. This way users wouldn't even need to install Python to get PARPG running but we could simply ship PortablePython with the release. I would prefer this over creating a binary via py2exe:
http://www.portablepython.com/
« Last Edit: November 23, 2009, 05:30:37 PM by mvBarracuda » Logged
Q_x
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« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2009, 08:51:26 PM »

Portable python looks dead for me - they haven't released anything new (and there is lots of stuff, mostly in 3.0.1 branch). So if PARPG won't run under the default set of libraries there, you may loose a lot of time setting it up.

As far, as the Linux branch is concerned, you can release sources/instructions only, because:
  • The instructions are easy to follow.
  • There is a lot of dependencies.
  • There is a lot of distros - several major needs separate packages.
  • This is only techdemo, packaging it will only make trolls angry.
  • I can't believe there may exist any serious, reliable Linux user under Ubuntu this days Cheesy
Better - do some video instead. I can't capture it (old lap will not make it possible), but I can produce some kind of promo video.

Or maybe just wait until packaging person with Ubuntu abilities appear?
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mvBarracuda
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« Reply #8 on: November 24, 2009, 10:15:36 AM »

I'm fine with that approach as well Q_x, just providing .tar.bz2 source package with instructions. In the end it comes down how the Linux-based devs would like to package PARPG, it's really up to them. As I'm running win32, that's the platform I'll worry about.
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shevegen
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« Reply #9 on: November 26, 2009, 01:09:54 PM »

I think providing the source on Linux is a lot better, as in less work for us.
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Kaydeth
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« Reply #10 on: November 28, 2009, 02:29:46 AM »

Here's a "beta" for the windows installer. Attached to ticket:
http://parpg-trac.cvsdude.com/parpg/ticket/113

Features Include:
Start Menu shortcuts for "run.py", "uninstaller", and a website link.
Writes registry keys that add the uninstaller to the add/remove programs list in the control panel.
PARPG icon is used for the installer as well as the uninstaller.


Known problems:
log_parpg.bat will not run (on vista at least) because python doesn't have write permission to the PARPG install directory.
saving probably won't work (on vista) because of the reasons above. Can't be tested at the moment.

Considerations:
Do we want to run the script from it's SVN location in a checkout when we package? Or do we want something more sophisticated?
Our README looks like crap in Notepad. Do we want to rename it as a .rtf on windows so it's opened by a different program like wordpad or microsoft word? Or do we want to make sure our README is readable in Notepad (not sure how this effects other OS).

Hopefully folks can give it a try and let me know if I'm missing anything.


EDIT:
forgot two things. For Barracuda mostly:
Do you want to include a publisher name?
Do you want to include a version number?
« Last Edit: November 28, 2009, 02:47:36 AM by Kaydeth » Logged
shevegen
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« Reply #11 on: November 28, 2009, 08:27:49 PM »

I comment anyway Cheesy version number, or at least the date of it being packaged up should be provided so that people can figure out how old the installer is. Isn't so important for techdemo I but may become more important later
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mvBarracuda
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« Reply #12 on: November 28, 2009, 09:39:23 PM »

Good work Kaydeth, I'll check it out later today :-)

Do we want to run the script from it's SVN location in a checkout when we package? Or do we want something more sophisticated?
Running from checkout location sounds fine to me.

Our README looks like crap in Notepad. Do we want to rename it as a .rtf on windows so it's opened by a different program like wordpad or microsoft word? Or do we want to make sure our README is readable in Notepad (not sure how this effects other OS).
I propose to simply add an RTF version of the README to our win32 installers instead of shipping it with the current SVN README. The README looks fine here, but I'm using gvim; not something that the usual win32 user runs.

Do you want to include a publisher name?
PARPG development team

Do you want to include a version number?
I would say: Techdemo 1 r<SVN revision number>

EDIT: More suggestions from my side. The UH installer asks the user if he wants to install ActivePython as well. If so, it either downloads ActivePython or simply starts the ActivePython installer that ships with the UH package (they offer two flavours). Would be great if we could ask the user if he wants to install ActivePython and PyYaml as well. I guess 95-98% of the users who'll test the techdemo won't have (the right) Python version (2.6) installed to run PARPG.
« Last Edit: November 28, 2009, 10:29:17 PM by mvBarracuda » Logged
Kaydeth
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« Reply #13 on: November 29, 2009, 12:26:30 AM »

EDIT: More suggestions from my side. The UH installer asks the user if he wants to install ActivePython as well. If so, it either downloads ActivePython or simply starts the ActivePython installer that ships with the UH package (they offer two flavours). Would be great if we could ask the user if he wants to install ActivePython and PyYaml as well. I guess 95-98% of the users who'll test the techdemo won't have (the right) Python version (2.6) installed to run PARPG.

Yeah that's the next step. Can we steal that part of the script from UH?
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mvBarracuda
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« Reply #14 on: November 29, 2009, 12:44:32 AM »

Yep, AFAIR all their code including the script is released under GPL 3.0. As we use the same license for PARPG, that's totally fine.

EDIT: Just asked one of the UH devs at their channel. All of their code, including the win32 installer script is released under GPL 3.0. So it's fine to reuse it for PARPG.
« Last Edit: November 29, 2009, 01:25:35 PM by mvBarracuda » Logged
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